Birding, Birders and all things Birds


Birding, Birders and all things Birds

This group is for birding, birders and bird enthusiasts. One can be a pet owner, researcher, Ornithologist, birder that is advanced or novice. Anyone interested in birds!

Members: 34
Latest Activity: Sep 17

Discussion Forum

Arranged Bird Marriages Are Less Successful Than True Love

Started by Steph S. Sep 17. 0 Replies

Love ConnectionZebra finches have a lot in common with human couples: They…Continue

Songbird habitat affects reproduction, survival

Started by Steph S.. Last reply by Steph S. Aug 28. 2 Replies

A University of Montana professor who studies birds around the…Continue

Little Tern's air miles equal two and a half times round the world

Started by Steph S. Aug 10. 0 Replies

Wildlife conservationists studying rare Little Terns nesting…Continue

Global seabird populations have dropped 70 per cent in past 60 years say researchers

Started by Steph S. Jul 23. 0 Replies

Researchers at the University of British Columbia (UBC) have revealed…Continue

Petey the Puffin tells the future

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Jul 16. 3 Replies

Here's Petey the Puffin, trying to swallow a butterfish that's far too large for his throat.... the little grey fluff ball... keeps tossing his head back, trying to choke down the…Continue

Tags: tipping point, phytoplankton collapse, Gulf of Maine, Climate Destabilization, Petey the Puffin

Seabirds may navigate by scent

Started by Steph S. Jul 15. 0 Replies

Seabirds called shearwaters manage to navigate across long stretches of…Continue

Bird-Safe Wind Power

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Grinning Cat Jun 30. 1 Reply

Chaska company designs wind turbine of the futureBird proof wind energy that harvests works in low wind, what a…Continue

Tags: bird safe, wind energy, SheerWind's INVELOX technology

Male peacocks keep eyes low when checking out competition

Started by Steph S. Jun 16. 0 Replies

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA — Eye-tracking cameras show that peacocks checking out…Continue

Go fish! Ancient birds evolved specialist diving adaptations

Started by Steph S. May 26. 0 Replies

Date:May 22, 2015Source:Taylor & FrancisSummary:A new study of…Continue

Comment Wall


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Comment by Joan Denoo on November 24, 2013 at 10:35pm

6.6 cm is 2.59843 inches! They are lovely! and so tiny!

Here are Google images:

Comment by Steph S. on November 24, 2013 at 6:43pm

Ruth and Tony!! Wow fantastic. Thanks for posting such wonderful bird pics. Ruth that one is really funny too. haha

Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on November 24, 2013 at 11:47am

This is a take off from the ad.

Comment by Tony Carroll on November 24, 2013 at 11:21am

From the Wikipedia article

Tufted Coquette

    The Tufted Coquette ( Lophornis ornatus ) is a tiny hummingbird that breeds in eastern Venezuela, Trinidad, Guiana and northern Brazil. It is an uncommon but widespread species, which appears to be a local or seasonal migrant, although its movements are not well understood.

This small bird inhabits open country, gardens and cultivation. It is 6.6 cm long and weighs 2.3 g. The black-tipped red bill is short and straight.

The male Tufted Coquette is a striking bird. It has a rufous head crest and a coppery green back with a whitish rump band that is prominent in flight. The forehead and underparts are green, and black-spotted rufous plumes project from the neck sides. The tail is golden rufous.

The female lacks the crest and plumes. She has green upperparts, except for the whitish tail band, and rufous underparts which become much paler on the belly. The tail is mostly bronze green with a dusky band and whitish tips to the feathers. Immature males are like the female, but the throat is whitish with fine dark spotting.

The female Tufted Coquette lays two eggs in a small cup nest made of plant down and placed on a branch.

Tufted Coquettes are tame and approachable. Their food is nectar, taken from a variety of flowers, and some small invertebrates. The small size and steady flight means that this hummer often resembles a large bee as it moves from flower to flower. The call of this species while feeding is a light chik.

Comment by Steph S. on November 23, 2013 at 9:34pm

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 23, 2013 at 9:15pm

Patricia, Fantastic owl in flight; so graceful and focused. 

William J Gonzalez and Peter Cordel , I look forward to getting to know you. This is a great place for bird lovers!

Comment by Idaho Spud on November 23, 2013 at 7:19pm

That's fascinating how the owl tucks-in it's wings and tail at just the right moment, and expands them as soon as possible, loosing very little altitude.

Comment by Steph S. on November 23, 2013 at 5:07pm

Oh wow Patricia - I love that GIF. So beautiful.

Comment by Steph S. on November 15, 2013 at 9:18pm

Nice to have you William - thanks for joining

Comment by William J Gonzalez on October 22, 2013 at 6:10pm

I also share my home with a lilac crowned parrot.


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