Politics, Economics, and Religion

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Politics, Economics, and Religion

Religion has so many connections to political and economic beliefs, there needs to be a place to identify linkages, problems, goals, options, action plans and evaluation criteria.  

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What is the purpose of life?

An eternal question, what is the purpose of life?, occupied philosophers’ thoughts throughout history. Stone pictographs reveal even primitive peoples reflected on this query. Each one has the capacity to define his or her personal thinking about politics, economics and religion.

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Comment by tom sarbeck on September 26, 2013 at 4:17am
  • ...the questions remain unanswered.

Sentient, Chris: not so. Daniel Webster is alleged to have said if we take the decision-making into our own hands we won't do too much harm. If we leave it in the hands of others we do no good.

The number of employee-owned businesses is growing.

Employee ownership's purpose is wealth creation, so it will grow more rapidly than political democracy is growing.

I hope we reach the tipping point while earth is habitable.

Comment by Plinius on September 26, 2013 at 1:34am

You're right, Sentient, the questions remain unanswered. I've seen it so many times now, that people petition against dangerous workshops and child labor and then lean back contentedly. Take away child labor and the children will be exploited as prostitutes, petition again and everything goes underground but the exploitation remains. Marriage? Too horrible to think of when young girls are sold into marriage. The weak have no protection.

I only climb into a neat outfit for work; at home I wear old things. Wonderful how long you can use old clothes.

Comment by Daniel W on September 25, 2013 at 8:27pm

I can't  figure out what to think about buying clothes and other stuff made, in foreign factories, by people who get paid almost nothing.  On the one hand, it's exploitative.  No question in my mind.  It supports near-slave conditions dangerous.  On the other hand, if we are willing to pay more, then would those clothes be made domestically?  Which is not a bad thing, but then how do those poor folks in Cambodia and Pakistan feed their families?  Should I send the person who made my shirt a check to help them?  No way to know who made the shirt.

Then again, thinking, say, of the millions who were killed in the Congo to supply rubber for tires and electrical insulators, were the Americans and Europeans who benefited from those products, partly responsible for the horrendous abuses?

I don't know the answer to those questions.

For work, I buy nice shirts and trousers at the local department store, on sale, and wear them until they almost wear out.  I get my neckties online. 

But for puttering and working in the garden and just at home, most of my clothes are from yard sales and estate sales and Goodwill.  I keep hoping someone will see me in Home Depot and say - "That's just like the shirt I got Grandpa for Christmas a couple of years ago" so I can say "Maybe it IS the shirt you got him for Christmas!"

When I lost so much weight this year, I went into the basement and sorted through clothes I kept when I became too fat to wear them.  It was like going to my own estate sale.  "That's a nice shirt!  I'll wear it". 

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 25, 2013 at 1:13pm

Chris, I like your idea. Knitting socks not so appealing, I don't like to knit ... on the other hand, I may enjoy it if I tried it again now that I am not as mobile as I was 50 years ago when I last tried. Winters are as full for me as summers because I like to read and putter. 

Please share a photo of your socks when you are done. 

Comment by Plinius on September 25, 2013 at 10:59am

So we'll buy more expensive clothes, and hope that the people who made them have a better life. To compensate the extra money, we'll learn once more to use clothes much longer, and learn to repair them. I'm practising knitting socks. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 25, 2013 at 2:50am

Daniel, I agree that we are on the cutting edge of a sharp knife that will show up in a leveling out of wages world wide, demands for access to part of the profits in exchange for production, and a very new normal. What that will look like and feel like, I have no idea. I just know that Chinese, Indians, Developing nations demand a part of the economic pie. The exponential growth of population will only confound the problems already facing us.

Now, the trick is to remain calm, think about those things that really matter, and act as if we know what the h*** we are doing.  

Comment by Daniel W on September 24, 2013 at 10:01pm

The end of cheap garments is near.  BBC.

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 16, 2013 at 1:12pm

Grinning Cat great piece. Thanks. I'm sharing.

Comment by Grinning Cat on September 16, 2013 at 12:27pm

I just learned that Bill Maher coined a new term, "blacktrack", "the act of changing one's mind because President Obama has agreed with you. See also: 'pulling a one-hatey' or the 'Kenyan boomerang'." (Or as one commenter suggested, an "Obamarang".)

http://videocafe.crooksandliars.com/heather/bill-maher-coins-new-te...

Comment by Joan Denoo on September 14, 2013 at 8:14pm

A “Biblical” View of Marriage?

I could not find an original of this piece and wrote Hector Avalos. He sent me this site. 

"So, while it is not accurate to state that biblical texts would allow marriages between people of the same sex, it is equally incorrect to declare that a “one-man-and-one-woman” marriage is the only allowable type of marriage deemed legitimate in biblical texts.

"This is not only our modern, academic opinion. This view of the multiple definitions of “biblical” marriage has been acknowledged by some of the most prominent names in Christianity. For example, the famed Reformationist Martin Luther wrote a letter in 1524 in which he commented on polygamy as follows: 'I confess that I cannot forbid a person to marry several wives, for it does not oppose the Holy Scriptures.'”

"Accordingly, we must guard against attempting to use ancient texts to regulate modern ethics and morals, especially those ancient texts whose endorsements of other social institutions, such as slavery, would be universally condemned today, even by the most adherent of Christians."

~  Robert R. Cargill, assistant professor of religious studies at the University of Iowa; Kenneth Atkinson, associate professor of history at the University of Northern Iowa; and Hector Avalos, professor of religious studies at Iowa State University.

 
 
 

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