Politics, Economics, and Religion

Religion has so many connections to political and economic beliefs, there needs to be a place to identify linkages, problems, goals, options, action plans and evaluation criteria.  

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  • tom sarbeck

    HuffPo?

    The one now owned by General Electric?

  • Joan Denoo

    @Joseph 

    I disagree with you that poverty  “isn't an example of how people make bad choices.” Just by simple observation, I agree that US prejudices limit opportunities for many people, i.e. nationality, race, religion, age, size, etc. There exist all kinds of things that limit the opportunity for otherwise skilled people. I do make the mistake of thinking of white populations because that is the culture with which I am acquainted. However, out of my all-white elementary (0 non-whites) and secondary school (400 white to 24 people of color+-). I observed foolish elementary school students at the 40 and 60-year reunions, and they exhibit the same silly behaviors as when we were kids. Why did those stupid kids not make sensible decisions when they reached the ripe old age of 60 and 80? I haven’t a clue! Did they want to be poor? I don't think so. Did they want to live in run-down houses? Hardly. Did they like to drive beat-up clunkers? I can’t imagine it. 

    What about the minority kids in my high school class? I was pretty good friends with most of them, and they all sought education in the skilled trades, in businesses, or in professions. What was different about those kids who had few opportunities, and what opportunities they did have they created themselves. Also, their parents pushed them very hard. They were mostly at the top of my math and science classes in high school. Perhaps their parents understood that life was going to be harder for them than for their white classmates. 

  • Joan Denoo

    I agree with you, Joseph, when you wrote, “Some of these people living in poverty don't have the foundational education, having grown up in poverty with a horrible home life.  Some simply don't have the raw intellect.  Many people end up in horrible circumstances, at no fault of their own”

    I think I can be classified as having grown up in a dysfunctional home and I confess to running away to marriage thinking I was going to escape free of the bonds that bound me to family violence. Once I realized I was caught in the same trap as my mother and both grandmothers, at 37-years old I ran again except this time I ran toward self-sufficiency. I am so grateful I did. A lot of people get caught in such traps. 

    When I returned to college it was easy to get grants and scholarships so I was able to pay off my education to the master’s level in a couple of years. That is not possible now. 

    I had three 10-year olds to feed when I ran so I also did a lot of strategic planning, i.e. I grew a huge garden out of a piece of land that was pure weeds. I went to our local mom and pop grocery and told them what I was doing to support myself and asked if there were any way I could get protein and dairy at a cheaper price. They agreed I could scavenge in their back room and take outdated meat and dairy at $1.00 a box. I took advantage of that for one year and I have been a full paying customer ever since, 42 years ago. 

    I was in error when I liked the idea of Penn’s and libertarianism. Housing, food, health care, transportation, and education, when left to the market, creates, maintains, and perpetuates poverty. It is in the national interest to provide stability and opportunity to low-income people. 

    The present economy with such skyrocketing prices leaves more people behind. Libertarianism does not fill the gaps. We need a fundamental change in our politics, economics, education and a lot of other things. 

    I would include in that fundamental change is to give up superstition and mythology as guiding principles.